Knitting sisters from Aylesbury save tiny piglets as extreme cold snap hits farm

Staff at the farm were 'blown away' by the sisters' kindness

By James Lowson
Wednesday, 22nd December 2021, 11:39 am
Updated Wednesday, 22nd December 2021, 1:50 pm

Tiny piglets were kept warm at a Bucks farm thanks to the quick-thinking and textile skills of two sisters.

The sisters, one of which lives near Aylesbury, got out their knitting needles and wool to build blankets for the piglets.

Born at Kew Little Pigs in Amersham, the piglets were introduced to the world right when Storm Barra was at its peak.

Kew Little Pigs

Sisters Judy Pearce and Debbie DeGroeve, came to the rescue using their knitting needles to create cosy patchwork.

Staff at the farm say that the new babies have absolutely loved being cosy and warm, thanks to the kindness of strangers this Christmas, and farm manager Kate Skinner, 28 has been tucking the lucky porkers into their woolly wrappers.

Knitter Judy, who lives in Aylesbury told the Animal News Agency: "When we heard about the new piglets we wanted to make sure they didn't get cold, and really enjoyed making the knitted blankets.

"It's a far kinder version of pigs in blankets for Christmas than the sausage and bacon version, and they look super cute all wrapped up."

The piglets enjoying their new blankets

The eight week old piglets, who staff have named Cratchit, Tim, Scrooge and Marley after the Dickens classic A Christmas Carol, were born straight into a cold snap, but under the watchful eye of their mother Daisy they are thriving.

The late births were a bit of a surprise for the farm, after resident stud boar Blanket hopped over a fence and secretly impregnated Daisy.

Oliva Mikhail, who runs Kew Little Pigs, said: "The piglets are very hardy, but we were blown away by the kindness of Judy and Debbie, and can't thank them enough for the gorgeous blankets.

"It is very cold at the moment, but all the pigs and piglets are doing well."

The farm attraction breeds micro pigs, who will go to live in people's homes as pets, so there is no fear that these pampered piglets will end up on the dinner plate.