Campaigners to save Aston Clinton pub to visit brewery head office

The Rothschild Arms in Aston Clinton
The Rothschild Arms in Aston Clinton

Last week we reported that residents in Aston Clinton are rallying in a last ditch attempt to save their beloved 172-year-old local pub, The Rothschild Arms, that is due to close on 1 September.

Last week we reported that residents in Aston Clinton are rallying in a last ditch attempt to save their beloved 172-year-old local pub, The Rothschild Arms, that is due to close on 1 September.

In spite of the current tenants desire to stay on and the insistence of campaigners that it is a viable business, the brewery Punch Taverns have sold the building to property developers.

Now campaigners, who have raised around £15,000, are embarking on a new approach. On Wednesday, 40 local residents will board a coach to the head office of Punch Taverns in Burton-on-Trent to seek answers from their senior management face to face.

A Save the Roths campaign spokesperson told us:

“We simply want Punch to listen and consider the offer that we have to buy the plot, develop the car park and let the current landlords keep the pub. We don't understand why they won't consider this as an option.”

In another development, we have become aware of an apparent contradiction in Punch's statements on this issue.

In a comment provided to the Bucks Herald last week, Punch said, among other things, “the Rothschild Arms was marketed for sale for almost two years, during which time we were unsuccessful in selling the pub as a going concern.”

However minutes of an Aston Clinton parish council meeting from January 2018 includes the following:

“Councillor Colin Read reported that some of the committee members had met representatives of the Rothschild Arms, including a representative of Punch Taverns and their planner. Councillor Read updated the committee with a summary of the meeting as follows:

They had put their case forward for keeping the development to five dwellings, including conversion of the public house. They also appeared to take on board some of the committee's design suggestions. However, they did not seem aware of the stage that the neighbourhood plan was at and clarified that the price that they had marked the public house at was not the market value for a going concern but was the development value of the site.”

Punch have been approached for a comment but have yet to respond.