New sails installed on Quainton windmill

Quainton windmill's new sails were installed earlier this week - following a six year wait.

Quainton's village news correspondent Keith Sutton wrote of the installation: "There were some ‘problems and more engineering work is needed’ to ensure that the mill can be fully restored as a working mill.

Photo of Quainton windmill with its restored sails - photo by Bernard Hall

Photo of Quainton windmill with its restored sails - photo by Bernard Hall

"It is unlikely that it will grind as much flour as it used to in the past as there are concerns that if it were to do so some parts would deteriorate and once again render the mill inoperable.

"During the two days when the sails were installed many people visited the site to see the work being done and parties of children from the local school were able to enjoy seeing the sails on the mill – something most of them had never seen before!"

Project manager for the windmill's restoration Ian Bragg explained the sail restoration was part of a wider project.

He said: "The reason for the restoration was that during an inspection in 2012 it was noted part of the timber headframe was rotting and becoming a safety risk.

"We decided while we had to shut it to repair the timber headframe we would also install new sails.

"It has been a long six year project done by a dedicated team of 12 volunteers.

"The renovation has been mainly financed by the owner Colin Dancer with the remainder coming from grants."

Visitors are welcome to the mill on Sundays from 10am to 12noon and organisers hope viewing sessions will start on April 7.

Although it is unlikely to grind flour commercially, which it did prior to the start of the restoration, it is hoped it will be able to do some flour grinding for open events.

The Quainton Windmill is privately owned and has been in the same family since it was built in 1832.

It is also the tallest iconic heritage tower windmill in the county.