Marsworth to commemorate displaced Poles from the Second World War

Buczak family in Nissen hut
Buczak family in Nissen hut

Between 1948 and 1958, Marsworth played host to up to 900 Polish people displaced by the events of the Second World War.

Tony Gabis, from Marsworth Camp said: It is not widely known these days that, between 1948 and 1958, Marsworth played host to up to 900 Polish people displaced by the events of World War Two.

There was a sports field at the camp where football and volleyball were'played - apparently Aylesbury Football Team was unbeatable, having several'Polish international players.'

There was a sports field at the camp where football and volleyball were'played - apparently Aylesbury Football Team was unbeatable, having several'Polish international players.'

"Many of them settled, worked and had children in the surrounding areas.

"In spring 2019, it is hoped to erect a memorial sign at the entrance to the field where the camp was located in Long Marston Road.

"We would like to make contact with as many people as possible who have a direct connection with the camp. As well as names and contact details, we would especially value any photos or memories.

"It is hoped that on the occasion of the unveiling of the sign there will be a celebratory gathering of people associated with the camp at which such information can be displayed, and to enable all those concerned to share in reminiscences."

Event c. 1950 - procession - children in Polish costume

Event c. 1950 - procession - children in Polish costume

The Polish Resettlement Act 1947 offered British citizenship to displaced Polish troops who had fought against Nazi Germany and opposed the Soviet takeover of their homeland. Some 250,000 chose to remain in Britain and were joined by their families and dependents from wherever the fortunes of war had left them.

A total of about 30,000 Polish dependants came to Britain in 1948, by far the largest number being those who, having escaped from Siberia with the Polish Army in 1942, had spent the war in Displaced Persons camps set up by the British in India and East Africa.

Some 40 hostels were opened to house them. Because of the shortage of houses, the only accommodation available were the camps and hostels left empty by the running down of British and American forces.


At Marsworth 900 were housed in the huts and Nissen huts which were part of Marsworth/Cheddington Airfield. This had been established by the RAF but in 1942 the airfield was handed over to the United States 8th Army Air Force.

Edward Buczak, motorbike outside the Nissen hut

Edward Buczak, motorbike outside the Nissen hut

If you feel you can contribute, or know of someone who could, please contact Tony Gabis via e-mail at marsworth.camp@gmail.com.