Huge turnout in Winslow for Remembrance Sunday

Winslow Remembrance service
Winslow Remembrance service

Winslow town centre was literally brought to a standstill on Sunday morning as an estimated 2,500 people took part in the Remembrance commemorations.

Winslow town centre was literally brought to a standstill on Sunday morning as an estimated 2,500 people took part in the Remembrance commemerations.

Winslow Royal British Legion Standard Bearers at War Memorial with 51 wreaths for the fallen

Winslow Royal British Legion Standard Bearers at War Memorial with 51 wreaths for the fallen

From early in the morning, hundreds of people began to gather at the War Memorial outside St. Laurence's Church, eager to get a prime spot for the arrival of the parade and the Remembrance service.

The parade, which itself consisted of a staggering 300 people, began moving down the High Street towards the War Memorial at approximately 10:35am, led by Parade Marshal Sergeant Liz Fahy and the Great Horwood Band.

After Reverend Andrew Lightbown had opened the service, President of the Winslow Royal British Legion (RBL) George Langley somberly read out the names of the 51 men from the town who died during the First World War while a poppy wreath for each of the fallen was laid by Scout members at the War Memorial in their honour.

Poppy Appeal Organiser Mark Randall said:

Winslow Girl Guides at the War Memorial

Winslow Girl Guides at the War Memorial

“George read the names out slowly and it really sunk in. It was so moving.”

The RBL President followed with the Exhortation:

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old; age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.”

The infamous war poem by Canadian physician Lieutenant-Colonel John McCrae, 'In Flanders Fields' was then read by Derry French, Director of Music, St. Laurence Church.

'In Flanders Fields' was written on 3 May 1915, inspired by the funeral of friend and fellow soldier Lieutenant Alexis Helmer, who was killed in the Second Battle of Ypres, where McCrae himself had fought. Sadly, the Ontarian died of pneumonia in the final year of the war.

The Winslow Remembrance parade then marched around the Market Square and back past the War Memorial for the salute to round off what was a fitting tribute to those who sacrificed so much as a result of war.

Mark Randall wrote:

“I would like to thank everyone who attended the Winslow centenary Remembrance day, and all who were in the parade. All the hard work over the last few months paid off, so we could remember everyone who gave the ultimate sacrifice in Winslow.”