Back In Time: The Story behind Benjamin Disraeli in the Market Square

To complete the story of Aylesbury's Market Square statues, this week we focus on the one of Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield.
To complete the story of Aylesbury's Market Square statues, this week we focus on the one of Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield.

To complete the story of Aylesbury's Market Square statues, this week we focus on the one of Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield.

To complete the story of Aylesbury's Market Square statues, this week we focus on the one of Benjamin Disraeli, Earl of Beaconsfield.

He was born on December 21st 1804 in Bloomsbury, London to Jewish-Italian parents. From an early age he had aspirations of being member of parliament but was unable to because he was Jewish.

Eventually this rule was abolished and he was then able to fulfil his ambitions. In addition to his political career he was a gifted novelist and wrote many titles. He was MP for Buckinghamshire, Chancellor of the Exchequer and also Prime Minister twice.

The statue was first proposed in June 1913 and was to be paid for by public subscription. All was going to plan until war broke out.

This put a halt to proceedings and nothing was again mentioned about it until the middle of 1922. The sculptor, H. C. Fehr of London was the same man who sculpted the Hampden statue so his work is well represented in the square.

On September 6th 1923 the statue was unveiled by Lord Cottesloe, Lord Lieutenant of Buckinghamshire. It depicts Disraeli in the robes he wore when he was Chancellor of the Exchequer