Aylesbury student organises children's writing competition to raise funds for her China trek

Bucks children's writing competition in aid of the Florence Nightingale Hospice - pictured are the winner Tilly Taylor (front right) - Long Crendon School.'From left are second place author Alfie Toms from Bedgrove Junior School, third place author Matilda Clarke from Wendover Junior School and fourth place author Lily Rea from Long Crendon School. Back of the photo is author Nick Halliday
Bucks children's writing competition in aid of the Florence Nightingale Hospice - pictured are the winner Tilly Taylor (front right) - Long Crendon School.'From left are second place author Alfie Toms from Bedgrove Junior School, third place author Matilda Clarke from Wendover Junior School and fourth place author Lily Rea from Long Crendon School. Back of the photo is author Nick Halliday

A student from Aylesbury has organised a children's writing competition to raise funds for her trek of the Great Wall of China.

Emily Jenkins, 18, organised the event for pupils aged nine to 12, as she remembers taking part in a similar event when she was that age.

Children's author Nick Halliday

Children's author Nick Halliday

More than 150 schoolchildren from all across Bucks entered the competition in which they were challenged to write a story of around 200 words on the theme of helping people.

The entries were whittled down to a shortlist of 15 by a panel of judges, who then chose a top four.

They received their prizes at an event at the Florence Nightingale Education Suite which featured a talk from children's author Nick Halliday.

The winning story was "A Cry For Help" by Tilly Taylor from Long Crendon School (story featured below).

Competition organiser Emily Jenkins

Competition organiser Emily Jenkins

Second place went to Alfie Toms from Bedgrove Junior School, third place went to Matilda Clarke from Wendover C of E Junior School and highly commended was Lily Rea from Long Crendon School.

Emily, who goes to the Sir Henry Floyd Grammar School is hoping to raise £3,000 for her trek - half the money will go towards covering the costs of her excursion in November while the other half will go directly to the hospice.

Emily said that the hospice is a cause very close to her heart: "In May 2018, my boyfriend's dad, Rob, passed away after fighting a brain tumour for 18 months.

"He was cared for in the Florence Nightingale Hospice and later at home by their 24/7 team, and every single staff member and volunteer I encountered while visiting him was absolutely lovely, to both him and everyone around him.

"I enjoy doing work for charities and so when I had to do work experience for school I worked at the hospice and it was then that I decided to do this trek."

The Florence Nightingale Hospice is encouraging supporters to take part in trekking along the Great Wall of China, in this the hospice's 30th anniversary year.

Emily said: "I am not an adventurous person but after a lot of thought I decided to sign up and start fundraising.

"I am starting to do some longer walks in readiness for the trek."

Emily is part of a group of 17 who are completing the trek in November.

To donate visit https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/ems-china-challenge

Story competition - winning entry - A Cry For Help by Tilly Taylor from Long Crendon School

Fires still raged on, even though the night of horrific bombing had finally passed.

‘Jet let’s ‘ave a look here,” exclaimed the ARP warden.

Nose close to the ground, the dog sniffed its way to where the warden had indicated.

“Help!” came a muffled cry.

The dog cocked its ears and started to bark excitedly.

‘Someone’s trapped under all this rubble!” yelled the warden suddenly.

Slowly a hand began to emerge from the collapsed building where once a fine house stood.

“Please help me!” implored a frightened voice weakly.

Jet began licking a small bleeding hand that was protruding from the debris, as the warden carefully pulled bricks and rubble off the child.

“It’s alright.

"Please don’t worry.

"Before now I have got people out of worse situations.”

After an hour of back-breaking labour, the warden and Jet managed to free a boy, aged about 12, whose clothes were speckled with blood and brown hair plastered with dust.

“Thank you,” uttered the boy weakly for the tenth time.

“I can’t tell you how grateful I am.”

“Best get you to ‘ospital,” the warden said wearily after a long pause.

“They will patch you up!”