These are some of the statues removed amid Black Lives Matter protests

As the Black Lives Matter movement continues to gain momentum around the world, statues of controversial and racist figures have been taken down in the UK, the US, and beyond

Monday, 15th June 2020, 4:33 pm
Updated Monday, 15th June 2020, 4:35 pm
These are some of the statues that have been taken down as the Black Lives Matter movement continues to gain momentum (Photo: MICHAEL BRADLEY/AFP via Getty Images)
These are some of the statues that have been taken down as the Black Lives Matter movement continues to gain momentum (Photo: MICHAEL BRADLEY/AFP via Getty Images)

These are the statues that have been taken down so far.

There have been repeated calls for the statue to be removed, and on 12 June, it was taken down. Hamilton was a British navy commander and was accused of killing indigenous Maori people in the 19th century
Robert Clayton, president of St Thomas’ Hospital in the 17th century, was a banker who was connected to the Royal African Company, which shipped slaves across the Atlantic. St Thomas' Hospital said they will take down the statue

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Thomas Guy founded Guy's Hospital in the 18th century and had shares in the South Sea Company which was involved in the slave trade. The hospital said that the statue would be removed, but not when
The statue of Edward Colston was taken down by Black Lives Matter protesters on Sunday 7 June, and was thrown into the Bristol harbour. Colston was an infamous slave trader
Robert Milligan was a noted slaveholder who owned two sugar plantations and had 526 slaves in Jamaica and the Canal and River Trust said that the statue of him was taken down to "recognise the wishes of the community"
Jefferson Davis led the Confederacy through the American civil war, saying, "African slavery, as it exists in the United States, is a moral, a social and political blessing."
Castleman was a confederate soldier who was very vocal about segregation between black and white people. His statue was removed in Louisville, the day after the BLM protest took place in Bristol
A bust of Leopold II in the University of Mons was taken down following a student led petition that said the bust represented the "rape, mutilation and genocide of millions of Congolese".
In Garfield Park, the controversial monument was removed on June 8. The monument had been erected in 1912 to remember the Confederate prisoners of war who died at Camp Morton in Indianapolis