Seeleys House 'requires improvement', but shows signs of progression

Seeleys House Short Breaks Centre is a residential care home offering a respite care service for people with a learning disability and or physical disability.
Seeleys House Short Breaks Centre is a residential care home offering a respite care service for people with a learning disability and or physical disability.

The care home, which offers 'respite care' to people with disabilities, has been slammed in it's latest Care Quality Commision report, requiring improvement in several areas.

Seeleys House Short Breaks Centre is a residential care home offering a respite care service for people with a learning disability and or physical disability.

The council announced back in December 2016 that it was taking back the Seeley’s House contract from Bucks Care, a company that they paid £8m to handle respite care for adults with physical and learning disabilities.

The report was published last week, with the service being rated 'good' in terms on being a caring service and being responsive to resident's needs.

One resident event commented it was "the best it has ever been", however it is still 'requiring improvement' in several key areas, including safety and effectiveness.

The report found people were supported and treated with dignity and respect; and involved as partners in their care.

The report states: "People were not routinely protected from avoidable harm. One person, who was at high risk of choking, had been left unsupervised in the dining area. Risk assessments were not written or routinely available to staff to advise them on how they should support people safely"

Later in this report the problems emanate from a lack of staff during mealtimes to support residents.

However, following several brutal care quality commission reports and a London School of economics report that uncovered "organisational abuse" of residents, the report states "improvements had been made to the environment and people's experience of the service."

You can read the original story we did here.
On the whole, things appear to be moving forward for the beleaguered home and the report reflects that better practice is taking place than on previous inspections.

However, the report says there were instances in which residents 'human rights were not protected', because of a failure of staff to understand the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

Staff did not always refer people who had restrictive measures in place to protect them from harm to the local authority for an assessment of deprivation. However, this time around staff demonstrated a better understanding of the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

The report said: "The provider acknowledged that "Mental Capacity Act and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards are an area of on-going development in relation to the knowledge and skill of all staff at the service.

"We are continuing to develop and embed the knowledge and skills of staff regarding Mental Capacity Act and this remains a high priority, to ensure that people are involved in their decisions and that clients have as much choice and control as possible."

You can read the full report here