Margaret from Great Missenden features in powerful portrait series to raise awareness of bowel cancer

Margaret Chung, 66, from Great Missenden features in a powerful portrait series for Bowel Cancer UK, in their campaign #ThisIsBowelCancer
Margaret Chung, 66, from Great Missenden features in a powerful portrait series for Bowel Cancer UK, in their campaign #ThisIsBowelCancer

Margaret Chung, 66, from Great Missenden features in a powerful portrait series for Bowel Cancer UK, in their campaign #ThisIsBowelCancer

Margaret Chung’s daughter, Annabel died aged 36, just seven months after being diagnosed with the disease; the UK’s second biggest cancer killer. Margaret hopes that by appearing in the photo series she can share her daughters story and prevent other young people from dying of bowel cancer.

Margaret Chung said: ‘‘There isn’t a word in the dictionary that can express just how awful it was to lose Annabel. Especially knowing that if her symptoms had been taken seriously earlier, she might still be with us. When she was here Annabel touched so many people’s lives so knowing that through this, she has contributed and is still helping people, is a life saver for me. I just wish she was here

Bowel cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the UK, with almost 42,000 people diagnosed.

More than 16,000 people die each year of the disease making it the UK’s second biggest cancer killer, but it shouldn’t be as bowel cancer is treatable and curable, especially if diagnosed early.

Although the disease is more common in the over 50s, it can affect people of all ages. More than 2,500 people under 50 are diagnosed with bowel cancer in the UK every year.

Deborah Alsina MBE, Chief Executive of Bowel Cancer UK said: “These incredible images are a beautiful homage to those affected by bowel cancer. Young, old, female or male – it can affect us all.

“Around 268,000 people living in the UK today have been diagnosed with bowel cancer. But it doesn’t just impact the person with the disease. It touches their families, friends and colleagues, doctors and nurses, scientists and researchers. That’s millions of people right across the UK. We need more people affected by bowel cancer to come together and take action to create a future where nobody dies of this disease.”