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Talk on Bucks’ role creating weapons of mass destruction

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Bucks’ role helping design weapons of mass destruction will be discussed at a charity event by popular historian Gordon Rogers.

The 79 year old, who was a close friend of the late astronomer Sir Patrick Moore, is also planning a second talk about his observatory – located at his home in Long Crendon.

Mr Rogers is an expert on Winston Churchill’s ‘Toy Shop’ – a secret weapons research base at the Firs in Whitchurch which helped the allies win the Second World War.

Between 1939 and 1945 weapons such as delay jumping bombs were created, which once scattered would jump into the air and explode at different times – meaning the enemy could never know if a piece of land was safe to enter.

Other creations include water bombs which would oscillate up to the surface and then back down until they found a submarine.

The toy shop also experimented with mobile tank bridges – where the tank would fire a bridge over a void using rockets and then drive over it.

The talk, in aid of Scannappeal, is at Latimer Place in Chesham on Friday March 15.

The following Friday, March 22, Mr Rogers will discuss his observatory in a talk at Hartwell House called The Sky At Night.

The amateur astronomer was such a good friend of the late Sir Patrick Moore that he was asked to write his obituary for The Astronomer Magazine,

Sir Patrick once presented an episode of TV show The Sky At Night from Mr Rogers’ observatory.

Graham Maret, chairman of the SW Herts Astronomical Society, said: “Gordon has given two talks to our astronomical society, both of them very informative, entertaining and extremely well presented.

“Gordon has a deep knowledge of astronomy and has extensive experience in astro-imaging in particular.

“His light-hearted approach makes his talks suitable for all audiences from children to serious astronomy groups.

“Gordon’s talks are first class, his stunning images of deep sky objects are a delight to see.”

For more details call 01494 734161 or visit www.scannappeal.org.uk

 

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