Uniquely trained dogs are helping disabled people live their lives to the full!

PIONEERING work by national charity Dog A.I.D was witnessedby impressed guests at a bi-annual event in Aylesbury this weekend.
PIONEERING work by national charity Dog A.I.D was witnessedby impressed guests at a bi-annual event in Aylesbury this weekend.

PIONEERING work by national charity Dog A.I.D was witnessed by impressed guests at a bi-annual event in Aylesbury this weekend.

The unique charity helps disabled people train their pet dog to become a qualified assistance dog and in turn restore their confidence and independence.

On Saturday, clients from across the country gathered at Stoke Mandeville Stadium where they took part in group training classes.

Sandra Fraser, Dog AID's CEO, said: "These kind of events help to create a community because often disabled people feel like they are very isolated.

"By coming together for extra training, our clients are able to make new friends who they stay in touch with and meet up with outside of Dog A.I.D.

"It's days like these that help increase our clients' confidence and self-esteem."

Special guests from Blind Veterans UK, Parkinson’s UK, MK Snap and Agria Insurance were welcomed on the day to see the results of the charity's hardworking volunteers.

Maureen McColl, CEO of MK Snap, said: "I was so touched by the difference this charity is making.

"It is inspiring to see the hard work of the volunteers who are helping to improve the lives of so many people."

Training classes included dogs being taught to open and close doors, as well as learning how to calmly approach visitors who come to the house.

The charity teaches dogs of all ages and breeds, from cockapoos to huskies, young to old, proving it's never too late to teach an old dog new tricks.

Dog A.I.D patron Roger Jefcoate CBE DL said: "The charity is largely run by volunteers who are doing incredible, life-changing work.

"Moving forward we hope to lift the profile of the charity because we want everyone to know all the wonderful things we are doing here at Dog A.I.D - and help more and more people in the future."

Dog A.I.D currently has 89 dogs in training and 75 fully-qualified partnerships across the country.

There are also more than 100 qualified trainers working with Dog A.I.D based all over the UK.

Sandra added: "We are always looking for volunteers to help with fundraising and events.

"We especially need able-bodied people to help our clients attend events and put up gazebos and tables."

For more information about Dog AID, visit their website www.dogaid.org.uk, follow @dogaid on twitter or like /DogA.I.D on Facebook.