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Margaret’s sight saved by a tiny telescope

Margaret Ward, from Willow Road in Aylesbury -  who has had pioneering eye surgery - pictured with her husband Charles PNL-141003-124743001

Margaret Ward, from Willow Road in Aylesbury - who has had pioneering eye surgery - pictured with her husband Charles PNL-141003-124743001

A great grandmother has been able to see her husband properly for the first time in 15 years after having one of the world’s smallest telescopes implanted in her eye.

Margaret Ward, 90, of Willow Road, Aylesbury celebrated her 68th wedding anniversay with husband Charles, 95 on Sunday.

And thanks to the pioneering surgery Margaret, who met Charles when they were both stationed in North Africa during the Second World War could see his features again.

She said: “I am still in love with my husband Charles and it has been awful not seeing him properly for the past 15 years.

“During my simulation session before my operation to implant the telescope, I was asked to cover over the eye that wouldn’t have the device in it, that’s my left eye, and hold a hand held telescope with the same 3x magnification as the implant to the other eye, and focus on Charles’ face.

“I can see he hasn’t changed at all in the past 15 years. He doesn’t have any wrinkles.

“He’s lovely and I am not one just to go on looks alone!”

She added: “I also have eight great grandchildren and to be able to see their faces properly and to see their expressions is really exciting.”

Before the surgery Margaret suffered from advanced late stage macular degeneration in her right eye, and central vision loss in her left eye.

The condition in her right eye meant that she could only see out of the corner of her eye and could not recognise faces, read or cook without help.

To correct the condition consultant Ahmed El-Amir, at the Spire Dunedin Hospital in Reading, implanted the tiny telescope into her right eye last December.

Margaret is one of only seven people in this country to have the surgery - and she must now retrain her brain to use the telescope to see.

She said: “Before the surgery I struggled to see people properly, even people that I knew well.

“I never knew who was speaking and I would have to say who are you - which was awful when it was someone I knew well. This has given me my social life back.”

 

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