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Calibre is transforming lives of partially sighted – and being used by 92 year old downloader

Pictured: The Home Secretary supporting the work of the charity during the 2011 Tory conference

Pictured: The Home Secretary supporting the work of the charity during the 2011 Tory conference

A charity which provides audio books for people who cannot read print has launched an online streaming service.

Weston Turville-based Calibre Audio Library was created in the 70s because 95% of books and magazines were not available in audio, large print or braille versions.

Until now it just posted audio-books, but is now taking advantage of the digital revolution.

The charity says its streamlining service will work on tablets, smartphones and netbooks as well as traditional computers.

Spokeswoman Nicole Russell said: “We’re able to open our library shelves to many more people who want to listen to the latest best sellers on their way to work,in the garden or lazing by the pool on holiday.

“Members have been quick to respond to streaming with a noticeable number of applicants over 75 years of age.

“In fact, our oldest streaming newbie is a sprightly 92 year old.

“People can also listen to samples of all our 6,200 digital books via the library section our website.”

In 2011 the charity was the Tory Party conference’s social action project and Prime Minister David Cameron recorded a story, along with Home Secretary Theresa May (pictured).

For more details visit www.calibre.org.uk

 

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