Hold your babies BEFORE they are born! Controversial 3D baby printing could be coming to a town near you soon

Expectant mums and dads can now hold their babies BEFORE they are born - with the introduction of 3D printed baby models. Photo: SWNS
Expectant mums and dads can now hold their babies BEFORE they are born - with the introduction of 3D printed baby models. Photo: SWNS
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Expectant mums and dads can now hold their babies BEFORE they are born – with the introduction of controversial 3D printed baby models.

Private baby scan company Baby:Boo allows parents to create a life-like replica of their baby in the womb for them to take home with them and it is a growing trend which is predicted will spread across the country in the coming months.

An image taken from a 3D scan of baby in mummy's tum is sent off to a firm to be rendered into 360 degree form and printed in 3D.''Photo: SWNS

An image taken from a 3D scan of baby in mummy's tum is sent off to a firm to be rendered into 360 degree form and printed in 3D.''Photo: SWNS

An image taken from a 3D scan of the baby in the mother’s womb is sent off to a firm to be rendered into 360 degree form and printed in 3D.

It is then either be presented in a box or mounted in a frame for the wall.

Owner of Baby:Boo Katie Kermode, 32, said: “People do think it’s a little odd but it’s similar to creating casts of baby’s feet or hands. It’s actually a really lovely keepsake to cherish.”

So far the company, based up north in Lancashire, has been inundated with requests for the service - which costs the customer around £150.

The models can either be presented in a box or mounted in a frame for the wall. Photo: SWNS

The models can either be presented in a box or mounted in a frame for the wall. Photo: SWNS

The new practice and the rise in 3D printing availability means baby models could become all the rage for expectant parents despite being frowned upon in some quarters.

The idea was born after Baby:Boo owner Katie lost two pregnancies and wanted to create a better scan service for other mothers.

She now has two children, Alfie, three, and Sienna, two, with sales director dad, Craig, 36, and knows only too well how some women yearn to meet their babies in their womb.

She said: “After I lost two pregnancies I underwent fertility treatment and finally fell on pregnant with Alfie.

Business owner Katie Kermode with a 3D print of a scan. Photo: SWNS

Business owner Katie Kermode with a 3D print of a scan. Photo: SWNS

“But there was no way I could wait for 12 weeks to see everything was okay.

“I also has scans throughout, I think being pregnant is a scary time, especially if you have struggled to get pregnant. it’s nice to sit back and

enjoy your pregnancy and take some of the stress off. I found it to be quite addictive.

“The NHS aren’t there to provide a service for you, it’s there to check everything is going well with the pregnancy, there are a list of checks they need to do. They can’t be spending the time cooing over your baby with you.”

Katie says it is recommended to create a model from a scan at around 28 weeks of pregnancy when the baby has filled out and has fully developed, but as the baby is bigger at the stage there can only be a model of the baby’s head.

“If you wanted to have a model of the whole of your baby you would have to come at around 16 weeks,” said Katie.

“But then the baby isn’t fully formed – although it’s still amazing.”

Critics say the 3D printing is invasive and spoils the experience of meeting your child for the first time at birth.

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